Kovas Boguta - Cognicast Episode 055

We talk with Kovas Boguta about Session.

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Our Guest, Kovas Boguta

Music

Kovas chose "The Final Countdown" by Europe[1] to start the show and "Electricity" by OMD[2] to end the show.

Topics

Credits

Episode Cover Art:

Audio Production

Production Assistance:

Footnotes

  • [1] The Final Countdown reached #1 in 25 different countries. The opening riff was created using an analog Roland JX-8P synthesizer, a favorite of artist Gary Numan.
  • [2] During OMD's earliest years they effectively crashed in a corner of Gary Numan's tour bus.
  • [3] The folks at TOPLAP have interesting views on live-coding as it relates to art and music.
  • [4] The idea of session snapshots did not originate with Mathematica. Indeed, languages like Smalltalk and APL were designed with the snapshot model in mind.
  • [5] There are many who see file-centric programming as archaic and are exploring (and have explored) various ideas for circumventing it, including, but not limited to: iconic syntax, program composition via query, and environment snapshots.
  • [6] Chris Granger wrote a wonderful post about symbolic programming.
  • [7] Manuel Woelker wrote an interesting blog post about the similarities between Clojure, Git, and CouchDB data structures in his postPersistent Trees in git, Clojure and CouchDB.