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The New Normal: Tempo, Flow, and Maneuverability

Tempo. Most people are familiar with it in the musical sense. It’s the speed, cadence, rhythm that the music is played. It drives the music forward - and pulls it back.

But there’s more to tempo than a musical beat. In life, as author Venkatesh Rao described in his book, “Tempo,” it makes for some of the most memorable moments as it shifts faster or slower. In war, like in business, tempo - the speed at which you can transition from one task to the next - is a critical component for victory.

The New Normal: Failure Domains and Safety

Through this series, we've talked about antifragility, disposable code, high leverage, and team-scale autonomy. Earlier, we looked at the benefits of team-scale autonomy: It breaks dependencies between teams, allowing the average speed of the whole organization to increase. People on the teams will be more fulfilled and productive, too. These are nice benefits you can expect from this style, but it's not all unicorns and rainbows. There is some very real, very hard work that has to be done to get there. It should already be clear that you must challenge assumptions about architecture and development processes. But we also need to talk about critical issues of failure domains and safety.

The New Normal: The Art of War, Maneuverability, and Microservices

The word "antifragile" may be recent, but some of the concepts are ancient. In "Art of War", the renowned general, strategist and tactician Sun Tzu's states, “…water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows...” In an antifragile organization, we want to explore opportunities so resources flow like water into the things that are working, and abandon those that are not. 

Just as water retains no constant shape, there are no constants in an antifragile organization and IT infrastructure. To flow like water, you must be able to shift people and teams easily, create teams and systems easily, be able to tear down systems and remove people from working on projects that aren’t working. This requires an architecture that allows you to act locally but think globally. Some organizations are pursuing microservices to this end. Complex applications are composed of small, independent processes that focus on doing a single responsibility. With microservices, developers decouple software into smaller single-function units that can be replaced individually.