Articles

Technology The New Normal How We Work Customer Stories Testing | All Topics

The New Normal: Tempo, Flow, and Maneuverability

Tempo. Most people are familiar with it in the musical sense. It’s the speed, cadence, rhythm that the music is played. It drives the music forward - and pulls it back.

But there’s more to tempo than a musical beat. In life, as author Venkatesh Rao described in his book, “Tempo,” it makes for some of the most memorable moments as it shifts faster or slower. In war, like in business, tempo - the speed at which you can transition from one task to the next - is a critical component for victory.

The New Normal: The Art of War, Maneuverability, and Microservices

The word "antifragile" may be recent, but some of the concepts are ancient. In "Art of War", the renowned general, strategist and tactician Sun Tzu's states, “…water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows...” In an antifragile organization, we want to explore opportunities so resources flow like water into the things that are working, and abandon those that are not. 

Just as water retains no constant shape, there are no constants in an antifragile organization and IT infrastructure. To flow like water, you must be able to shift people and teams easily, create teams and systems easily, be able to tear down systems and remove people from working on projects that aren’t working. This requires an architecture that allows you to act locally but think globally. Some organizations are pursuing microservices to this end. Complex applications are composed of small, independent processes that focus on doing a single responsibility. With microservices, developers decouple software into smaller single-function units that can be replaced individually.

The New Normal: Protected Asset or Disposable Inventory?

The accounting department classifies software development work as a capital expense. That means, at least according to accounting, new software represents new capital investment that should increase productivity. This highlights a big divergence in the way accounting views software versus the way we should look at it.

We used to have a saying, “KLOCs kill.” The more lines of code, the more risk you have. As your system gets bigger it gets more complicated and difficult to work with. Code has a carry cost... you have to keep maintaining it. It has obsolescence risk. Undeployed code is exactly like unfinished automobiles: nobody pays you for it. Maintaining it is a liability not an asset. Excess code is a boat anchor that will weigh you down until you drown.

The New Normal: Minimize Risk by Maximizing Change

I once worked for a startup called "Totality." Our business was outsourced web operations for companies that either didn’t want to invest or lacked the skills to build and staff their own24x7 operations center. We handled all the production management, change management, incident management—essentially the entire ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) suite of processes.

During my time at Totality, we observed that nearly 50% of all our software outages happened within 24 hours of a software release. Since we were on the hook for uptime, but not new features, our response was obvious: Stop touching things!