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The New Normal: Tempo, Flow, and Maneuverability

Tempo. Most people are familiar with it in the musical sense. It’s the speed, cadence, rhythm that the music is played. It drives the music forward - and pulls it back.

But there’s more to tempo than a musical beat. In life, as author Venkatesh Rao described in his book, “Tempo,” it makes for some of the most memorable moments as it shifts faster or slower. In war, like in business, tempo - the speed at which you can transition from one task to the next - is a critical component for victory.

The New Normal: Team Scale Autonomy

You’re probably familiar with the concept of the two pizza team. This is Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos’ rule that every team should be sized no bigger than you can feed with two large pizzas. At Cognitect, we take this concept one step further: the one chateaubriand team—with sharper tools you can afford to spend the extra money on better food.

The two pizza team is an important concept. The idea is that smaller teams are more self-sufficient and typically have better communication and a greater focus on getting things done because they eliminate dependencies. Every dependency is like one of the Lilliputian ropes that ties Gulliver to the beach. Each one may be simple to deal with on its own, but the collection of 1,000 tiny threads keeps you from breaking free. Eliminate dependencies and your teams move faster. Encourage autonomy and you allow innovation.

The New Normal: Minimize Risk by Maximizing Change

I once worked for a startup called "Totality." Our business was outsourced web operations for companies that either didn’t want to invest or lacked the skills to build and staff their own24x7 operations center. We handled all the production management, change management, incident management—essentially the entire ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) suite of processes.

During my time at Totality, we observed that nearly 50% of all our software outages happened within 24 hours of a software release. Since we were on the hook for uptime, but not new features, our response was obvious: Stop touching things!